Potassium monitoring device saves money, increases quality of life in patients on dialysis

November 17, 2022

1 min read

Source/Disclosures

Source:

Bamforth RJ, et al. FR-PO542. Presented at: ASN Kidney Week; Nov. 3-6, 2022; Orlando (hybrid meeting).

Disclosures:
Bamforth reports no relevant financial disclosures.


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ORLANDO — Using a real-time potassium monitoring device in patients on hemodialysis saves more money than the usual care and increases quality of life, according to a presenter at ASN Kidney Week.

Further, investigators found the device prevents hyperkalemic events among patients on hemodialysis.

patient speaking with a doctor
Analyzes revealed the monthly break-even cost per patient in the base case scenario was $689.56. Source: Adobe Stock

Ryan J. Bamforth

Ryan J. Bamforth, MS, MSc, and colleagues compared the cost and quality of life linked with use of a real-time potassium monitoring device in patients on hemodialysis vs. usual care. Investigators designed a decision analytic microsimulation model from the point of view of the United States health care payer with the intention of conducting a cost-utility analysis.

The analysis focused on the monthly break-even cost per patient and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio comparing the two interventions, including costs related to hyperkalemic events and dialysis. Researchers derived utility estimates for patients on hemodialysis from a systematic review and meta-analysis. Additionally, researchers applied a 25% reduction in hyperkalemic events to the intervention scenario as a baseline effectiveness estimate.

Analyzes revealed the monthly break-even cost per patient in the base case scenario was $689.56. Further, the real-time potassium monitoring device provided 0.04 additional quality-adjusted life-years. Researchers noted that adjusting the effectiveness estimates between a reduction of hyperkalemic events between 10% and 50%, the monthly break-even costs ranged from $265.36 to $1,387.90.

“Basically, the takeaway result is that if we were to implement this continuous potassium monitoring device, if were to avoid 10% and 15% of all the hyperkalemic events in this population, this scenario would be both less expensive for the system and individuals would live longer quality-adjusted life-years,” Bamforth told Healio.

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